The Man I Miss, My Dada Jaan

 

The one person that would be the most excited about me starting Biscuits and Banarsi would be my late Dada Jaan. That’s one reason why it’s been so difficult for me to write about him.

He would probably comment on my posts and would love that I posted the kids pictures, but if I asked what he thought he would probably say “Good, but you can write something better.”  I would chuckle at his response and would make sure I got a compliment out of him!

Shams Quraeshi was a talented man with a a passion for learning. An avid reader, my grandfather was known as the Godfather of the books business in Karachi, Pakistan. He instilled in us that love for books from a very young age.  He bought me some of the best books that I have read including the Famous Five series and  books by Enid and Grid Blyton that he would get from the Frankfurt Book Fair in Germany.

Almost every year my Dadi Jaan and Dada Jaan would visit our family. My Dadi Jaan would be dressed in a shalwar kameez with a shawl draped lightly over her head and Dada Jaan would be wearing Clark shoes and a suit with a muffler. As soon as my sisters and I spotted them, we would run into their arms. We were eager to help unpack his suitcase because we knew at the bottom of it were all the goodies. Usually  this meant,  delicious Cadbury chocolate from England and the latest books from his most recent book fair visit.  Dada Jaan would waste no time and open all his suitcases the day he arrived.

If I was to share all the memories I have of my grandfather it would fill up this entire blog. From him trying different ways to lure me into learning my multiplication tables (he was so disappointed that I was allowed to use a calendar) to watching martial arts Kung fu movies for hours together. He would put up with my whims and would buy me things that I absolutely did not need, like my first Tweety watch from the Warner Bros. Store.

The one thing that means the world to me is that my eldest son got to spend time with his great-grandpa, even though it was for a short time.  I am overjoyed knowing that both people who I love dearly loved each other just as much, if not more!

My grandpa would skype with the kids everyday and many times I would ask him to virtually babysit. Other times we would chat about everyday things including what I should cook and what he was watching on television. I miss those conversations.

I feel blessed that I was able to spend a few months before my Dada Jaan went back to his Creator. He lived to be  82 years old Masha’Allah, it was hard letting go of such a special man, but his health was deteriorating.  When my eldest aunt (Bari Phupo Jaan) broke the news to the family, she said “Allah has shown his mercy to Daddy, now he is in a better place.”

Innalillahi wa Inalihi rajaun

Love you forever,
Saman


A book review of Hillary Clinton’s autobigoraphy “Living History”


Hillary Clinton, is not someone I was particularly fond of… or knew much about. I know that she is very prominent in national politics as a former first lady, a senator  and the  now current Secretary of State. Still Hillary Clinton’s autobiography was not high on my list (disclaimer: I don’t think there are any books that are high on my list except for the Baby Elmo series that we have recently purchased from the $ deals section in Target.) However when I saw “Living History” at my Husband’s cousin’s house, my curiosity kicked in.

I was not curious about her accomplishments as the first lady or even what it felt like to live in the White House but instead was drawn to her autobiography to see what Hillary Clinton thought of her husband’s affair. (I know that’s bad but it’s the truth)

Living History a 562 page memoir is about the eight year term that  Hillary was at the White House. She starts of the book with both her and Bill Clinton’s family backgrounds and their early life.The first part of the book is particularly interesting and it is humbling to see the backgrounds of both Bill and Hillary. Both their families came from a working middle class families. Hillary spoke about the role faith plays in her life such as the youth group meetings and various church activities. Her early interest in politics came because of her father’s passionate support of conservative republicans. An enthusiastic conservative republican like her dad, it was not until she was at Wellesley College that she became a democrat.

Her college years at Wellesley and then Yale gave me background to a person I had no knowledge about and Hillary gave the readers insight into her personal growth from a freshman undergrad to a mature law student. At the same time she told us about her boyfriends, trips with friends and her first introduction to Bill Clinton at Yale. The book is a chronological look at her life; it takes us on a journey through her career, her marriage to and then their foray into state politics and ultimately the White House.

Hillary shares  her dilemma of trying to fit the mold as the first lady. She talks in great detail of  balancing the act of being a wife, mother, a career woman and also living up to expectations of society. She chronicles the times of going in front of the Senate in support of her Husband’s bills and then meticulously selecting the appropriate china and laying out the table for visiting dignitaries. The book is honest but at the same time in many places also reads like a PR piece in which I can’t help but to think that she is helping to pave her way for the presidency. It did feel a little too glossed over when it came to the Clinton administrations fight for their health bill.

The most fascinating part of her book was when Hillary would recount her experiences traveling as the first lady and hosting dignitaries in Washington. The pictures she included in the book are great and you feel like this woman from Stanford who is the Secretary of the State is really not that different from us. Hillary is relatable talking about her bad hair do’s over the years and then her experience as the whole Monica Lewinsky scandal broke. Hillary gave the reader just enough insight into what she was feeling without highlighting the unfortunate incident. She was graceful and she showed the reader that although it was an earth shattering moment for her, she would keep moving forward. She talked about her faith,her friends and the women in her life that kept giving her the strength to move beyond the affair.

As I read the book I felt a deep connection and empathy for a woman who sometimes feels too stiff. The strengths of this book are that she lets down her guard and expresses feelings that make me relate to her. Also it was interesting to see that a woman no matter what level she has reached still struggles with some of the same decisions as women worldwide. Such as the decision to to change her last name  as well as giving up her career when Bill Clinton became President.

I must admit I actually enjoy reading biographies so reading the  autobiography was not the hard part. What was hard was trying to understand the complexities of the health care act that Hillary was constantly working on as the First Lady. Sometimes I would skip pages and get to the parts that I thought were more interesting, But I am glad that I read this book. Hillary Clinton is a force to be reckon with, we already have a African American president and I wouldn’t be surprised if Clinton will be our first woman president.

A Morning with Modern Mary

 

Abeer and I had the opportunity to visit Seema Sahin’s Boutique in Tysons Corner a few weeks ago, we were excited to talk with Seema to see how she manages her modesty clothing line as well as her family life with two young kids. While we chatted we got a chance to try some of her custom designs. Pictures and interview below:

 

BB: How did the idea of  Modern Mary come about?

SS: Giving women the chance to express themselves while being true to their identity. Finding modest fashionable designs in mainstream clothing stores is not only limited, but can pose a challenge for many women. It can be challenging finding styles that express their cultural heritage, American identity, and at the same time being true to their faith. I wanted to create a hassle free shopping experience for these women, offering them a fashionable alternative that already fits with the guidelines of their faith. What motivates me is trying to reconcile these three forces and translate them into my design.  Creating modest designs is one thing, but there is a certain flair to my designs that makes it stand out and appealing.

 

BB: How did you take the initial leap from an online based business to having a  boutique?

Modern Mary’s Boutique in Tyson’s Corner, VA

SS: I wanted women to have a fun and comfortable shopping experience. The only way was to bring the designs to them. I knew that an online store was not enough, which is why I decided to open up a boutique. The Boutique offers our customers an exclusive shopping experience without compromise to privacy and comfort. Modern Mary’s boutique is a first of its kind, catering to the Muslim market. Modern Mary’s boutique opened its doors to the public December 2010 outside of DC in the Northern Virginia area. Modern Mary’s full collection can be viewed at the boutique by appointment only. Custom evening and bridal wear available. We offer complimentary fittings when creating a custom design.

The designer of Modern Mary, Seema with her model

 

BB: Any advice for Muslim entrepreneurs who are thinking of starting their own business?

SS: When starting a business, it’s more than just pursuing a passion. Yes, you have to be passionate about what you are doing, but you also have to be persistent, willing to learn, and ready to play various roles. I can’t run a business by just designing- I had to learn to be a manager, bookkeeper, marketer, etc. Most importantly put yourself out there. It’s all about networking… network, network, and network! Let everyone know who you are and what you andyour business is about. There are many groups that you can join or attend (both Muslim based professional groups and non-Muslim professional groups). Take advantage of those networking opportunities because you never know what relationships you will create that would benefit your business or company.

 

BB: how do you manage it all, your family, household chores, family obligations? 

Orange layered tunic, $59

SS: It’s an everyday challenge! Being able to balance the role of being a mother, a wife, a designer, and an entrepreneur is not easy, and I’m still working to achieve that balance. Alhamdulillah, my passion for designing is what keeps me going. It’s a combination of time-management, organization, communication, and accommodation. Time management- balancing my time with the family and my business; Organization- otherwise nothing will get done! Communication- scheduling with my husband, or family members to watch the kids when I have an event, or need to be at the boutique; Accommodation- life happens, and need to accept that not everything will go according to plan—I have my Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology, but here I am pursuing a career in fashion design. Thankfully I have a great support network I can turn to when seeking help with taking care of the kids and other family obligations.

 

BB: Can you share your first runway experience with us? How did it feel seeing your clothes on the runway?

SS: My first major runway show was at DC Fashion Week Fall 2011. My designs were featured in their International Couture Collections show. Seeing my designs going down the runway and hearing applauds from the audience, not only was it amazing but a surreal moment. Being able to transform an idea into a vision, it’s truly rewarding. Fashion shows bring your designs to life. I hope to continue to watch my designs going down the runway.

Modern Mary Custom Dress, $128

 Like what you see? Check out Modern Mary’s designs:

www.modernmary.com

www.facebook.com/modernmaryboutique

http://twitter.com/#!/seemasahin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eid For Kids: quick tips to make this Eid an unforgettable one!

Ramadan is almost over, and one of the most important holidays of the year will be coming up very soon inshallah! Lets make sure that along with the food preparations and the guests that we try to build the excitement of Eid with our kids Inshallah!

Here are a few ideas that I have found:

1.Eid Coloring Sheets – Start of your Eid prep by going to this site and printing out free coloring sheets, let your kids color on the pages and then you can incorporate them into a frame on your Fireplace mantel or even just stick onto the fridge! When family or guests come they can proudly display their Eid Coloring pages. Eid Coloring Pages

2.Eid Cards –  Create or buy Eid Cards and and have your kids (depending on the age) draw or write something in the card, then go to to the post office and explain that the cards will be sent to  family members who can’t be wth us this Eid. You can encourage family and friends to also send mail back to the child who will be so happy to recieve their own letter. This can be a great learning experience about the post office and shows children the importance of family. (This idea was from the Adams Playgroup)

3. Eid Goody Bags – This next idea came from Pinterest (does anyone else love Pinterest?) Get white paper bags, get creative with stamps and tell the kids they are making Eid Goody Bags for their friends or siblings! Go to the store and let them pick a few items for their goody bag and assemble and keep to give on Eid! This craft teaches sharing and liking for others what you like for yourself.

www.littlelifeofmine.com

4.Eid Baking – Most kids like being around the kitchen and which kid wouldn’t like making special Eid Cupcakes or cookies! Get some crescent shaped cookie cutters a cookie mix and some sprinkles, let the fun begin! Here are some more creative recipes

5. Eid Presentation at class –  Arrange with your  child’s teacher when you can come in to explain or talk about Eid. Wear traditional clothes, take some thing to eat and depending on the age of the kids you can read a book like this one: Eid Books

6. Eid Gifts – Buy your kids Eid gifts! It doesn’t matter what it is as along as it is wrapped! Simple things like a candy bar, little coloring books, a pack of crayons can be wrapped and the kids will love opening their gifts inshallah! One website (http://www.askazizah.com/advice/makingeidfun.htm) had a great idea which was to wrap the presents a few days earlier and keep them in a room where the kids don’t normally go. In the evening before they go to bed you can let them see their gifts and say today you can only touch the gift but you can’t open them until Eid! This would help build up the anticipation and teach them patience!

7. Eid Decorations – Decorate your houses homemade crafts, store bought items – now we have companies like Modern Eid and Eid Creations which also give us more variety. Use Lights, balloons and make it a family event.

8. Eid Morning Suprise –  Balloons – This idea was so heartwarming one of the blogs suggested that parents fill up the kids room with balloons so when they wake up  on Eid morning to colorful balloons!

9. Eid games – Have a few age appropriate games at your Eid gatherings, some ideas are to fill up a pinata, play passing the parcel or have some sort of relay race or scavenger hunt in the yard. Prizes would be an added bonus.

10. Eid Takbeer – On the drive to the Mosque have the whole famly recite the Eid Tasbeeh – its is a Sunnah and is a  beautiful recitation.

Eid Takbeer: “Allahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, Laa ilaaha illallahu Wallahu Akbar, Allahu Akbar, Wa lillahil Hamd.”

(Translation: Allah is the greatest, He is the greatest. There is no god except Allah. He is the greatest. All praises and thanks are for Him)

 

What Woman Really Want…

Ramadan is half way through, thought we’d help you find some great gift ideas.Here is our Eid 2012 Gift Guide for the Women in your life

The Trendy Gift

Peep toe Sandals, $89

Sandals

Studded Bangle, $32.90

Bracelets

Michael Kors leather watch,$225

 Watch

 

The Colorful Gift

Green purse with shiny gold details, $19.80

Purse

Stone Ring, $65

Stone Ring

Colorblocked Apron, $32

Apron

The Pampering Gift

Luxurious Hand Cream Set, $30

Hand Cream

Aveda Spa service, Prices vary

Spa

The Beauty Gift

MAC lipstick set, $39.50

Lipstick Set

Salvatore Ferragamo perfume, $98

Perfume

Benefit makeup set, $45

Makeup Set

The Thoughtful Gift

A subscription to a magazine is always appreciated

Magazines

Haute Hijab-Bora Bora Scarf $35

Hijabs

Ramadan Beats

 

I hope this playlist keeps you going through this blessed month inshallah! Please click on the hyperlink.

please note: the * indicates songs that have musical instruments in them

1. Native Deen – Ramadan is Here* http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7VezcjXNec

2. Sami Yusaf – Hasbi Rabbi* http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRqTV1P9Zyk&feature=related

3. Qari Waheed Zafar Qasmi – (Urdu Song) – Fasalon Ko Takalluf Hai Humse Agar http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-oW8BGjh0g

4. Zain Bhika – Welcome O’ Ramadan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xv-TlLAUXQ

5. Sami Yusaf – You Came to Me* http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTxWbmOCkQE&feature=fvwrel

6. Junaid Jamshed – (Urdu Song) Ilahi Teri Chaukhat Per http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ze0Q8VRkLh4&feature=related

7. Zain Bhika – Eid-Un-Sa’Eid http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDdHkIbPfuw

8. Ali Haider- Maula Dil Badal De (Urdu Song) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twvTqQ5CJ-0

9. Yusuf Islam- Tala Al Badru Alyana  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5HiXM9JGJQ

10. Zain Bhikha: Mountains of Makkah http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvbgaw972c4

11. Waheed Zafar Qasmi: Allah Hu Allah Hu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MLgWjFyj8k

12. Mishary Rashid Al-Afasy: La Illaha Illallah http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs3cfmhBOkw

13. Kamal Uddin: Subhan-Allah http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2KEAy11srA

14. A Beautiful Dua: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzef68MZ0GE&feature=related

Keep the Kids Busy this Ramadan, While Staying Cool

 

It’s Ramadan but its also summer and that means long days, no schools and potentially cranky and bored kids!

Here are a few suggestions to beat the heat, while keeping the young ones entertained. A Ramadan tip is to do Ibadah while watching the kids grab your Quran in your purse or do Zikr while watching the kids have a great time!

1. Any indoor mall play areas: My favorite is the Fair Oaks mall play area it’s large enough and has many little things for the kids to climb on and explore. I have been to the Dulles and Tyson’s corner one as well, whichever is closer and convenient usually wins in my book.

 

2. Local public library: With plenty of books, tables and chairs, this is the place where young kids can begin to get exposed to library etiquette and the joys of reading. On certain days there are free book readings or activites, you would have to check on your county’s website for more details.

 

3. Chuck E. Cheese: Indoor play area – tokens are purchased to play the games or for rides, but keeps my kids entertained for hours with a very little hit to the pocket. Best part there are usually plenty of tables with booths for you to sit and read your Quran Tafsir.

 

4.Reston Town Center water sprinklers; Reston, VA – Dress your kids in their bathing suits bring a towel and sit back on the comfortable shaded lawn steps while the kids drain their energy and build up their appetite. If your there later closer to iftaar time there are a lot of dining options just a few steps away http://www.restontowncenter.com/index.php

 

5. Loudoun Sports Bounce, Ashburn Va: Kids will enjoy bouncing all the different bounce courses, large slides and  a playroom for 18 months and older, best part there’s AC and you won’t break a sweat! http://www.sportbounce.com/opengym.php

 

Have other ideas for beating the heat this summer? Please share.

 

 

 

 

 

Reminiscing Ramadan

When I was younger and lived with my family Ramadan was so much fun, now that I have my own family I hope that I can also make Ramadan memories with my kids. My mom made Ramadan an incredibly happy month for us. She was the glue that held the family and our Ramadan traditions together, she would spare no detail when it came to both  the sehri and iftaar table spread and much to her dismay would even tolerate our cravings for  french fries, doughnuts, Mcflurries, and other things over her freshly cooked food.

The mornings were the hardest (still are) My sisters and I would wake up to find my mom fully awake and frying shami kababs and eggs. There were always fresh parathas but  we much preferred eating cereal or even a frozen waffle. Mom would be chirping along enjoying her breakfast while my sisters and our dad would be eating like zombies. Somehow no matter how early we would wake up we would always be running late on our sehri, Dad would be updating us on the time  and would give us a 5 minute and a 2 minute warning. The 5-minute warning went something like this:

The 5-minute warning:

Dad: 5 minutes left, where’s the water?

Mom: oh no I haven’t even finished my food.  Kids drink lots of water

Kids: ok mom

The 2-minute warning:

Dad: okay lets go, only 2 minutes left

Mom: okay let me drink my water

Dad: there’s very little time left

Mom: I have to drink my really large glass of water no matter what

Kids: Mom were going to brush our teeth

Mom: drink all of your water before you go!

Mom: OK stop drinking your water and go brush your teeth we have no time left!!

 After the 2-minute warning:

Mom: still finishing her water

Dad: thats it, your fast is not valid! its past time!

Mom: Nothings going to happen, im okay, just about done

There was a lot of water gulping and pushing as my sisters and I  made it to the bathroom to brush our teeth and make wudu. After Fajr we would be fully awake but would still attempt in vain to snuggle back in our beds to get a few minutes of sleep before waking up for school. The day would pass in school activites and when we would come back home, we would rest  for a  bit until iftaar time. Is it bad if food is the thing that keep coming to mind, when I think back on spending Ramadan with my family? The warm samosas, the tangy cholay (chickpeas), and the cold dahi baray (yogurt dumplings). What’s funny is that at that time none of those things were a big deal. Around iftaar time I would start hovering around the kitchen and would help prepare the Rooh Afzah while filling my mom in on what happened at school that day.

During Ramadan we would go to many iftaari’s and frequently visit  the Mosque, this was fun for me because I would get to catch up with all my friends. As the days of Ramadan progressed we would start thinking about Eid. Eid was HUGE, I mean there was nothing better than Eid, and its funny because on the actual Eid Day we didn’t do much but there was so much anticipation that half the fun was preparing for Eid. Eid preparations for us consisted of two things our annual Eid party and our eid outfits.

The Eid party was something we really enjoyed and it seemed like everyone in the community would be there! My mom would make a slew of different traditional Eid foods and then ask all three of her daughters to make either a dessert or an appetizer, I would be the slacker when it came to cooking and would rather clean than cook and I somehow got away with it. Our eid clothes were of the utmost importance to us. We would either save a shalwar kameez outfit from the ones our family in Karachi would send us, or we would make our own! Our mother would make it a project and take us to JoAnn’s to pick out the fabric we liked, then the buttons, etc. She would guide us and then eventually we would lose interest or would get bogged down with school work and she would finish them up for us. After the shalwar kameez was ready we would  pick out shoes and jewelry to complete our outfits.

One of my favorite memories is on eid morning  when our mom would wake us up and she would look at our mehndi and comment on how great the color came out, she would be wearing her Eid Shalwar, an oversized t-shirt and bangles. She would always change into her kurta at the very end so that the ironing doesn’t get ruined. Once we were all in the car we would all recite the Eid Tasbih which is one of my most favorite things to do. After Eid Prayers we would start hugging everyone around us with a 3 embrace rule – while saying  Eid Mubarak all three of those times!

We would seek out our mom and she would be so happy to see us in our full eid outfits. After that we would meet all of the aunties in our community, who would be genuinely pleased to see us looking our best. I would hang out with my friends and we would be inseparable, Aleya, Kiren, Tahirah these were a few of my friends that I grew up with and we would make our way around the Mosque meeting our families and other community members. Our family was among the last ones to leave the Mosque because my dad would always help to count the Fitra money that the Mosque had collected.

We would then go to my friend Kiren’s house for an Eid breakfast, from there on, we would hop from house to house and eat all kinds of food. My friends and I would always try to stay together or plan out the day to see whose house we would meet up at next. It wasn’t that we were ever doing something very special but I remember having a blast. One of the uncles that we knew would be standing at the door with a stack of bills.  As children entered in the house he would give them a dollar. At about 5:00 after a full day of party hopping, we would make the long trek from Jacksonville  back to Orange Park and would immediately start preparing for the big dinner at our place.

We would do a Bollywood style outfit change and get ready to start hugging and greeting our guests with the traditional three time Eid Mubarak! Over the years we’ve had many different versions of Eid, but with the same pattern I described above, as we got older and my friends started driving we began going out in the evenings and meeting up our friends to get ice cream or go to a movie. One year Eid coincided with the release of the animated movie” The Last Messenger”  and the entire community was found at the movies.

Ramadan and Eid have definitely changed maybe because I’m older and I have my own family now,  but one thing is for certain that at the start of every Ramadan I become nostalgic for the Ramadan I spent as a child. I reminice about the days when I would go to the  Islamic Center of Northeast Florida and recognize every single person at the Mosque, of the times when our Dad would lead us in prayers and when I would wake up to my Mom’s excited exclamation of, “Eid Mubarak, today is Eid!”

 

Samosa Fest – An American Muslim Family’s tradition

 

There is nothing better than biting into a delicious crunchy golden samosa after a day of fasting, but there are several steps that go into making samosas and it can be a tiring and time consuming process.  The Ayub family has turned this very tedious process into a festive family reunion.

For the past five years the Ayub family has been having the pre-Ramadan Samosa Fests.  Women in their family sit around, enjoy each others company and make perfect triangular shaped samosas. The first Samosa Fest was born when family members began talking at an iftaar.

“We decided that everyone makes samosas, so we should get together and make them together,” explained Humaira Ayub, one of the hosts of Samosa Fest.

The women bring their own batch of keema from home and then add the onions and other “masala”  when they get to Samosa Fest. Then everyone helps to complete one batch (5 pounds makes approximately 150 samosas) for the family member, This takes about 45 minutes, said Ayub.

“When it comes to preparing the samosas the women form an assembly line. The younger girls of the family usually do the sticking of the samosas and the putting them into ziplock bags,  while the more experienced wrap the samosas,” said Ayub.

Family members have traveled several hours for this annual event and see it as a way to spend quality time and get into the festive Ramadan spirit. One year the entire family went to Boston, they made Samosas in the afternoon and then after that they went on a duck tour.

While  the women do the Samosa assembling the guys are usually throwing around a football and the event usually concludes with a big family dinner. Each year, a different family volunteers to host Samosa Fest. The host for the first Samosa Fest,  Sharmeen Khan, had custom Samosa Fest aprons made for all the guest.

” I wanted to give everyone a party favor and aprons seem to suit the event,” said Khan.

She also added that Samosa Fest is about creating traditions,  ” It’s just fun! It’s also an amazing way to pass on a tradition and skill. Since we’ve been doing this, all of us including the girls are great at making samosas.”

 

Does your family have any Ramadan traditions? We would love to hear about your family’s traditons!

B&B Recipe of the week – Kerala Shrimp Curry

Make the tamarind mixture by placing the tamarind paste, chilli powder, cumin and turmeric in a small bowl with the measured water and stir to mix well.

 

Heat the oil in a large nonstick frying pan over medium heat. Add garlic and shrimps and stir fry for a few minutes.

 

 Stir in the tamarind paste and the measured water. Bring to boil, reduce heat and stir.

 

Gently simmer on low heat add salt to taste. Now add coconut milk

Mix well and simmer for 2 more minutes. Remove from heat and garnish with cilantro, serve with rice. Enjoy!

Photo credit: Hamlyn 200 Curries